Events

This calendar lists all upcoming public events that are being organised by the History Council of Victoria (HCV), plus events that are added by our Friends and Members.

If you are a Friend or a Member of the HCV and you're organising an event in Victoria, Australia that relates to History, you are welcome to publicise it here. Click on the 'Host your own event' button at the foot of this page to get started. Please note that there may be a delay (for moderation) before your event becomes visible on the website. (People who haven't yet signed up to the Friends are warmly invited to do so.)

  • Tuesday, March 12, 2019 at 06:00 PM · 16 rsvps
    Old Treasury Building in East Melbourne, Australia

    Death, disease and pandemics

    This year marks the centenary in Australia of the ‘pneumonic influenza’ pandemic, popularly known as the 'Spanish flu'. Advances in chemistry, laboratory techniques, and equipment revolutionised medicine in the nineteenth century. Old ideas of infectious disease were gradually replaced by improved understanding of bacteriology and germ theory, leading to a new era of "scientific medicine” and a confidence in disease managed. Yet the challenges for "scientific medicine” were not over in the twentieth century, since pandemics and epidemics were still to take their toll on communities.

    The panel of historians at this seminar will share their insights into three major health crises that affected Victorians during the twentieth century: Spanish flu, Polio and AIDS.

    Bookings for this free event are now open.  To reserve your seat, click on the RSVP button at the foot of this page.

    'Spanish flu: mother of all infections' - Mary Sheehan, Living History

    Mary Sheehan is a member of the Living History team. She is a professional historian with 30 years’ experience in heritage, oral and commissioned histories, and is now a PhD candidate focusing on the 1919 Spanish influenza pandemic in Melbourne. 

    'The terror of polio' - Professor Janet McCalman, The University of Melbourne

    Janet McCalman AC is the author of three award-winning books: Struggletown, Journeyings and Sex and Suffering and for eight years she wrote a fortnightly column in The Age. In recent years she has been working on cradle-to-grave studies of historical cohorts: first, babies born in Melbourne’s Women’s Hospital 1857-1900; second, Aboriginal Victorians 1840-1985; third on convicts transported to Tasmania 1803-1852 (Founders and Survivors); and currently on men who returned to Australia after serving in World War I (Diggers to Veterans).

    She is working on a book about the former convicts who settled in Victoria—a hidden story of secrets and lies. She is a Redmond Barry Distinguished Professor at the University of Melbourne.

    'Community activism and the AIDS crisis in Victoria' - Lucy Bracey, Way Back When Consulting Historians

    Lucy Bracey is a historian with Way Back When Consulting Historians and co-author of several commissioned histories including ‘Under the Red Ribbon: Thirty Years of the Victorian AIDS Council/Gay Men’s Health Centre’.

    The seminar will be chaired by Dr Kathleen Neal, Monash University.

     

    Children with polio having a school lesson on the sundeck of the Frankston Children's Hospital, Jackson's Road, Mt. Eliza

    Children with polio having a school lesson on the sundeck of the Frankston Children's Hospital, Jackson's Road, Mt. Eliza
    Photographer: Lyle Fowler (1891-1969), Commercial Photographic Co.
    Image credit: State Library Victoria, www.slv.vic.gov.au

     

    With thanks to the series sponsors, Monash University Publishing and the Monash University History Program:

    Monash University Publishing - some current titles   Monash University History Program 

    and to the organising partners:

    Old Treasury Building     Monash University History Program      HCV

    The seminar is part of an ongoing series, Making Public Histories, that is offered jointly by the Monash University History Program, the History Council of Victoria and the Old Treasury Building. Each seminar aims to explore issues and approaches in making public histories. The seminars are open, free of charge, to anyone interested in the creation and impact of history in contemporary society. Click HERE to learn about other events in the series.

  • Tuesday, May 14, 2019 at 06:00 PM
    Old Treasury Building in East Melbourne, Australia

    Historians, places and the past

    This seminar explores the role of historians in place-making and heritage projects. Such projects can result in fresh interpretations of historic sites. Historians help preserve and reveal evidence of the past alongside new modes of access, adaptive re-use, and (re)development.

    Historians contribute research, analysis and insights to the development of heritage sites and places of historic significance. Their knowledge can help to maintain heritage values that are already recognised. Historians are also experts in discovering new information that contributes to our understanding of a place.

    While place-making can enable new forms of community engagement, it can also be controversial. There may be losses alongside the gains. The historian’s advice is not always heeded. Heritage projects usually require compromises. Many perspectives and demands may influence the final outcome.

    A panel of speakers shares some of the highs and lows of their experiences in this field. Panellists will then respond to questions from each other and the audience.

    This seminar is presented for the Australian Heritage Festival as part of the 2019 'Making Public Histories' series, offered by Monash University, History Council of Victoria and Old Treasury Building.

    The seminar will be chaired by Emeritus Sir John Monash Distinguished Professor Graeme Davison AO FAH FASS, of Monash University and the History Council of Victoria.

    Bookings for this free event will open immediately after the launch of the Australian Heritage Festival program.

     

    With thanks to the series sponsors, Monash University Publishing and the Monash University History Program:

    Monash University Publishing - some current titles   Monash University History Program 

    and to the organising partners:

    Old Treasury Building     Monash University History Program      HCV

    The seminar is part of an ongoing series, Making Public Histories, that is offered jointly by the Monash University History Program, the History Council of Victoria and the Old Treasury Building. Each seminar aims to explore issues and approaches in making public histories. The seminars are open, free of charge, to anyone interested in the creation and impact of history in contemporary society. Click HERE to learn about other events in the series.

  • Tuesday, June 11, 2019 at 06:00 PM
    Old Treasury Building in East Melbourne, Australia

    Living histories: innovative approaches to oral history

    Oral historians from three exciting contemporary projects - all commended in the Oral History Victoria Awards for 2018 - will share their experience of making imaginative oral history in different media and how they coped with the technical, ethical or historical challenges posed in the creation of living histories. 

    Kirby Fenwick's audio documentary ‘The First Friday in February‘ tells the story of the first AFLW game, between Collingwood and Carlton in February 2017, through the memories of women who were in the stands. 

    Lee Valentine and Ryan Gustafsson produced Call Me by My Name, a series of moving and insightful podcasts with 10 trans and gender diverse people in and around Melbourne. 

    Rose Turtle Ertler's Light at the End is an oral history performance work where Rose asks refugees living in Victoria to respond to two intriguing questions, about a moment of light in their life and about what makes you strong. 

    Alistair Thomson, President of Oral History Australia, will facilitate the discussion. This seminar is run jointly with Oral History Victoria.

    Bookings for this free event will open on 1 May 2019.

    Image of the award-winning oral historians, speakers at the June 2019 seminar

    Pictured at the Oral History Victoria Awards announcement in 2018 are, from left: Rose Turtle Ertler, Ryan Gustafsson, Lee Valentine and Kirby Fenwick.

    Image credit: Oral History Victoria

     

    With thanks to the series sponsors, Monash University Publishing and the Monash University History Program:

    Monash University Publishing - some current titles   Monash University History Program 

    and to the organising partners:

    Image of OHV logo  Old Treasury Building     Monash University History Program      HCV

    The seminar is part of an ongoing series, Making Public Histories, that is offered jointly by the Monash University History Program, the History Council of Victoria and the Old Treasury Building. Each seminar aims to explore issues and approaches in making public histories. The seminars are open, free of charge, to anyone interested in the creation and impact of history in contemporary society. Click HERE to learn about other events in the series.

  • Tuesday, August 13, 2019 at 06:00 PM
    Old Treasury Building in East Melbourne, Australia

    The Past, Present and Future of Victorian Indigenous Languages

    With 2019 designated as the UN's International Year of Indigenous Languages, this public event will explore the destruction, survival, recovery and use of Victorian indigenous languages, and the use of Indigenous language in historical research and production. 

    Aunty Lee Healy (Dhagung Wurrung Elder and Education Officer/Linguist at the Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages) will reflect on her work in the recovery and use of a Victorian Indigenous language. 

    Alice Gaby (Associate Professor in Linguistics at Monash University) will consider the broader history and future of Indigenous languages around Australia. 

    Richard Broome (Emeritus Professor of History at La Trobe University) will consider the effects of European settlement on indigenous languages and how historians might use recovered languages.

    Alistair Thomson, President of Oral History Australia, will facilitate the discussion.

    Bookings for this free seminar will open on 1 July 2019.

     

    With thanks to the series sponsors, Monash University Publishing and the Monash University History Program:

    Monash University Publishing - some current titles   Monash University History Program 

    and to the organising partners:

    Old Treasury Building     Monash University History Program      HCV

    The seminar is part of an ongoing series, Making Public Histories, that is offered jointly by the Monash University History Program, the History Council of Victoria and the Old Treasury Building. Each seminar aims to explore issues and approaches in making public histories. The seminars are open, free of charge, to anyone interested in the creation and impact of history in contemporary society. Click HERE to learn about other events in the series.

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